English

Press Release

May 2, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Pam Stewart
(800) 363-9127 ext. 131
pam.stewart@emergencydispatch.org

 

IAED RELEASES PERFORMANCE STANDARDS 10th EDITION

 

The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) ED-Q Council of Standards has approved the release of Performance Standards 10th Edition, an updated version of performance requirements for all medical, fire, and police emergency calltaking. These new standards are integrated seamlessly into AQUA® 7 Ascent and will enhance a communication center’s ability to review cases and manage the quality assurance (QA) process. Standards 10 is the result of more than two years of feedback and input from members across the world desiring a more positive approach to quality review. 

While in the past communication center QA professionals, called ED-Qs, have used the Performance Standards to identify deviations from protocol, Standards 10 helps management assess overall calltaking performance of emergency dispatchers. By using Standards 10, managers can employ a more positive approach to quality assurance by delivering feedback using a strengths-based approach. Brian Dale, Associate Director of Medical Control and Quality Processes for the IAED, said, “Standards 10 makes it possible for management, ED-Qs, and emergency dispatchers to focus on improving the system, both of the calltakers and the software they’re using. Our feedback at NAVIGATOR was very positive, and we’re excited for everyone to begin using Standards 10.”

ED-Qs will benefit from the shorter, more succinct Standards that enable calls to be reviewed more efficiently, quickly, and accurately. Due to new research, these standards reduce call review requirements in most agencies, which ED-Qs will also appreciate.

Emergency dispatchers will also welcome the introduction of Standards 10. Previous versions required ED-Qs to emphasize minor emergency calltaking mistakes, often leading to low morale in the communication center where emergency dispatchers are already tasked with a high-pressure, stressful job. In some cases, the review process could strain relationships between emergency dispatchers and management. Standards 10 will help balance these negative feelings by also acknowledging the positive performance and excellent work of emergency dispatchers. 

For more information about Standards 10 and the IAED, visit emergencydispatch.org. For more information about how AQUA 7 Ascent can improve your center’s review process, visit prioritydispatch.net.

About the IAED

The IAED is the world’s foremost standard-setting and certification organization for emergency communications with over 64,000 members in 46 countries. More than 3,600 communication centers in 23 languages employ IAED’s protocols and training in medical, fire, police, and nurse triage dispatching.

January 30, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Pam Stewart
(800) 363-9127 ext. 131
pam.stewart@emergencydispatch.org

 

IAED releases Version 13.1 of Emergency Medical Protocol

The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) Council of Standards has approved a significant revision to the Medical Priority Dispatch System™ (MPDS®), and the IAED is pleased to announced the release of MPDS version 13.1. This new version is the latest and most up to date in a long line of Medical Protocol releases, the first of which made its debut 38 years ago.

MPDS v13.1 includes several enhancements and improvements that will affect many of the protocols. One of these is that the Agonal Breathing Detector is now called the Breathing Verification Diagnostic. This change more accurately describes when the tool should be used (it is used to verify effective breathing, not when the breathing appears to be uncertain or Agonal). Also, on Protocol 12, it's no longer make it necessary to use the Breathing Verification Diagnostic when it is obvious that the patient is actively waking up.

Protocol 23 also saw changes with this latest update that address the opioid and fentanyl crisis. There are additional Key Questions, suffixes, and instructions about opioids. New Key Questions also establish the availability of Narcan and naloxone when the patient has overdosed on narcotics.

Protocol 24 now includes information and instructions on Stillbirth and Female Genital Mutilation situations. The updated Protocol has also added a SIGNS-OF-LIFE Warning, which addresses stillbirth or miscarriage events where the infant has any signs of life. A revision to Protocol G helps the dispatcher more effectively handle products-of-conception versus fetus deliveries. The wording in the Protocol is now more sensitive and direct.

Version 13.1 also includes a new Operator Question for 3rd- and 4th-party callers in Protocol 32. Answers to the questions will directly enable the Determinant Code 32-D-1 "LIFE STATUS QUESTIONABLE."

"MPDS v13.1 is a prioritized release of protocol changes based on input from users and recent Dispatch Life Support research," said Brett Patterson, IAED Academics & Standards associate and Medical Council of Standards chair. "This is the first release in a new incremental strategy aimed at efficiency with clinical priorities taking precedence. These changes will provide needed options for EMDs dealing with challenging situations."

Priority Dispatch® has also updated the protocols in its ProQA® software to reflect these MPDS v13.1 changes. Key new features include: Sub-Chief Complaint (Sub-CC) Selection on Case Entry called the Selection Tree; added Trimester Calculator Diagnostic Tool that uses the reported "due date" to determine the gestational trimester of a pregnant woman; and a modified Sudden Arrest Reset Button on the Chief Complaint Protocols that handles arrest while on protocols with safety issues.

"At the Academy and Priority Dispatch, our goal is to help the emergency dispatcher do his or her job better," said Dr. Jeff Clawson, Chair, Rules Committee for the IAED Medical Council of Standards. "This increases safety and effectiveness for the first responders and creates better outcomes for callers. By implementing the IAED's MPDS v13.1 changes in ProQA, we know that certified emergency dispatchers using ProQA have the best and most intelligent tool available to reliably and efficiently help their callers and first responders."

For more information about MPDS v13.1 and the IAED, visit the website at http://www.emergencydispatch.org. For more information about how the Medical Priority Dispatch System can increase the effectiveness and safety of your EMS system, visit priority dispatch.net.

About the IAED

The IAED is the world's foremost standard-setting and certification organization for emergency communications with over 64,000 members in 46 countries. More than 3,000 communication centers in 23 languages employ IAED's protocols and training in medical, fire, and police dispatching.

August 15, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Chris Knight, Chief of PPDS Program Management and Implementations

(800) 960-6236 ext. 306

chris.knight@emergencydispatch.org  

Kris Berg, Director of Marketing and Communications

(800) 960-6236 ext. 116
kris.berg@emergencydispatch.org 

 

IAED announces release of Police Protocol Version 6.0 

The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) announces a new version of the Police Priority Dispatch System (PPDS®) that was officially released July 6, 2017. 

PPDS v6.0 is built upon the speed and precision of each preceding version to enhance the ability of Emergency Police Dispatchers (EPDs) to gather the most appropriate and accurate information to assess scene safety so field responders can act effectively. The updated PPDS has more than 200 changes from the previous version.

                  Version 6.0 of the PPDS introduces its most versatile and flexible protocol to date. It allows for greater agency control over operational decisions within the center and in the field. Post-Dispatch Instructions (PDIs) concerning advice given to callers when following a suspect vehicle are provided based on the agency’s discretion to support or not support this action by callers. PPDS v6.0 also provides protocol refinement throughout each Chief Complaint in an effort to speed up call processing while still obtaining the relevant information needed in today’s police call processing environment. Several new protocol pathways were added to streamline call processing for CUSTODY ISSUES, illegal hunting, THREATS, HARASSMENT where the suspect was never on the scene or is unknown,
and FRAUD/FORGERY committed by electronic means, through the mail, or on the telephone.

                  “This gives agencies the opportunity to make the protocols more conducive to their agency and geographic area,” said Chris Knight, IAED Chief of PPDS Program Management and Implementations.

Other significant improvements found in PPDS v6.0 include the following:

·      

A new feature to immediately select, on Case Entry, an already known, specific event (Sub-Chief Complaint), rather than simply just picking a more general Chief Complaint

·      

A new University Version for agencies on college campuses. The University Version includes important modifications to Protocol 103: Administrative (Lost or Found Property, Found Unexploded Ordnance, Messages, Transports) to handle student transport requests and incidents involving international students reporting an emergency

·      

A new Military Version for agencies on military bases. The Military Version includes important modifications to Case Entry, Protocol 123: Missing/Runaway/Found Person, and Protocol 131: Traffic/Transportation Incident (Crash), including a new Key Question sequence for AWOL incidents

·      

Added Determinant Codes for SHOOTING and STABBING in Protocol 106: Assault/Sexual Assault

                  “Version 6.0 gives our user agencies many of the features they’ve been asking for,” Knight said.

                  Since its inception in August 2001, the PPDS has remained the single-most widely used protocol for police dispatching and pre-arrival aid, and it has continually advanced with the current standard of care and practice worldwide.

The IAED is responsible for updating and maintaining the separate protocol dispatch systems for law enforcement, fire, and medical emergency communication systems used in more than 62,000 centers worldwide.

 

February 27, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Mike Rigert

801-363-9127, Ext. 318

mike.rigert@emergencydispatch.org

www.emergencydispatch.org          

IAED’S BRETT PATTERSON LAUDED AS JEMS’ EMS10 INNOVATOR AT EMS TODAY

 

SALT LAKE CITY—The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) is pleased to announce that Brett Patterson, IAED Chair of the Medical Council of Standards and Academics & Standards Associate, received the Journal of Emergency Medical Services’  EMS10: Innovators in EMS Award Feb. 22 at JEMS annual EMS Today Conference & Exposition, held this year for the first time in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The JEMS accolade recognizes 10 recipients who demonstrate their innovation in moving the level of EMS care forward during 2016. 

“Brett becomes one of an elite group of people with only 10 being selected each year for this prestigious award,” said A.J. Heightman, JEMS Editor-in-Chief. “It's not only a prestigious award but it also gives a window into the world of EMS. And because of his work and the other nine selectees’ contributions, we're able to progress and move EMS to the next level. Being an innovator means developing ways that are more efficient and better for patient care, and Brett exemplifies that.”

Patterson directed the Academy’s construction and debut of the Medical Priority Dispatch System™ (MPDS®) version 13.0 with which he was personally involved in reviewing of all Proposals for Change (PFCs), directing protocol research, and leading the Council through months of evaluation and protocol development. His numerous Academy roles include protocol standards and evolution, cultural and language development, research, curriculum, training, and quality improvement. A member of the IAED College of Fellows and Rules Committee, Patterson became a paramedic in 1981 and began his EMS communications career in 1987. Prior to joining the Academy, Patterson served for 10 years as an EMS professional for Pinellas County, Florida, USA.

“The recent scientific realization that basic life support quality is perhaps the most important link in the sudden cardiac arrest chain of survival has put a spotlight on the critical role dispatchers play in resuscitation,” Patterson said. “I have been honored to play a small part in helping dispatchers to understand and appreciate this role by helping to evolve the clinical standard of dispatch care via protocol.”

The IAED is the world’s foremost standard-setting, certification-granting organization for emergency communications with over 62,000 members in 45 countries. More than 3,000 communication centers in 21 languages and dialects employ IAED’s protocols and training in medical, fire, police, and emergency nurse triage dispatching. Of those, nearly 200 comm. centers have become Accredited Centers of Excellence (ACEs).

June 8, 2016

CONTACT:
Kris Berg
800-363-9127  EXT.116
kris.berg@emergencydispatch.org

 

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM TRAINING GUIDELINES FOR TELECOMMUNICATORS FINALIZED

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (June 9, 2016)—A group of 9-1-1 organizations jointly will announce, during the annual National Emergency Number Association (NENA) trade show and conference, that it finalized recommended minimum training guidelines for the nation’s 9-1-1 call-takers and dispatchers, culminating a three-year effort. The topics to be included in the recommended guidelines were identified by members of the following organizations, as well as other key stakeholders representing the 9-1-1 community, including:

  • Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO)
  • Connecticut Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection
  • Denise Amber Lee Foundation
  • Fairfax County (Virginia) Department of Public Safety
  • Greater Harris County 9-1-1 Emergency Network
  • Hamilton County (Indiana) Public Safety Communications
  • International Academies of Emergency Dispatch (IAED)
  • National Association of State 9-1-1 Administrators (NASNA)
  • National Emergency Number Association (NENA)
  • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
  • North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG)
  • PowerPhone
  • Priority Dispatch
  • RedSky Technologies
  • Rochester/Monroe County (New York) Emergency Communications Department
  • Stafford County (Virginia) Sheriff’s Office
  • Vail (Colorado) Public Safety Communications Center
  • Weakley County (Tennessee) Emergency 9-1-1

The effort was driven by the belief that it is vitally important Americans receive a consistent level of 9-1-1 service no matter where they live or travel, said Nathan Lee, president of the Denise Amber Lee Foundation.

“Consequently, there must be agreed-upon common elements that ensure the person who answers a 9-1-1 call has met baseline core competencies,” Lee said. “We believe that the result of this effort will be that the public ultimately will receive a more consistent, effective and professional level of service from telecommunicators across the United States.”

While the National 9-1-1 Program has facilitated the Project by providing a forum for discussion and development, the Guidelines are not federally owned or mandated—rather, they are the joint product of members of the Working Group listed above. 

The recommended minimum training guidelines cover the following topics:

  • Telecommunicator roles and responsibilities
  •  9-1-1 call processing
  • Radio communications
  • Emergency management
  • Emergency communications technology
  • Legal concepts
  • Interpersonal communications
  • Stress management
  • Quality assurance
  • On-the-job training guidelines

In addition, numerous subtopics were identified for each topic listed above. It should be noted that the topics identified in the Guidelines provide minimum-level understanding. In order to field and manage emergency calls in a live environment, telecommunicators must receive supplemental training that will enable them to process the discipline-specific emergency calls that are fielded by their respective PSAP/9-1-1 Center or Emergency Services Provider.

 

The Guidelines were vetted by the 9-1-1 community at large, via the NENA Workspace platform, before they were finalized. All comments received were adjudicated by a subcommittee formed specifically for this purpose; the subcommittee was comprised of Working Group members who had volunteered for the task.

“The comments received were positive and supportive of the effort, and the result,” said Laurie Flaherty, program manager for the National 911 Program. “This is a watershed moment for the 9-1-1 community, and many people put their heart and soul into making these guidelines a reality.”

A parallel goal of the Project was to develop Model Legislation for any state that does not currently have legislation concerning minimum training for telecommunicators. For those that do, the Model Legislation is intended as a baseline to ensure that the recommended minimum training topics are being covered.

The Academy’s Emergency Telecommunicator Course (ETC) was developed in the late 1990s and is kept current by the ETC Board of Curriculum. Along with on-the-job training, the ETC course meets and exceeds the recommended minimum training guidelines for all 9-1-1 telecommunicators as redefined in this needed, nationwide framework for the baseline of training required for all 911 calltakers and dispatchers – regardless of the discipline(s) they work in. 

When ETC education is combined with the structured call-taking protocols, continuing education training,and quality improvement programs found in the Academy’s Emergency Medical, Fire, Police, and NurseTriage courses, telecommunicators become fully trained and prepared for today’s challenging emergency dispatch environment.

 

RECOMMENDED TRAINING GUIDELINES FOR 911 TELECOMMUNICATORS IN DEVELOPMENT

View Training Document

June 3, 2016

Contact: Kris Berg
800-363-9127, Ext.116
kris.berg@prioritydispatch.net
www.emergencydispatch.org   

SALT LAKE CITYThe International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED) has released an updated version of its Fire Priority Dispatch System (FPDS®) v6.1 that more accurately differentiates two incident types covered under Protocols 60, 61, and 66.

FPDS v6.1a seeks to make the distinction between the two incident types—the chief complaint’s unknown odor and natural gas leak—clearer by removing the rotten egg description of a suspected natural gas leak from the Protocol 61: HAZMAT shunt on Protocol 66: Odor (Strange/Unknown). While using the FPDS, the foremost chief complaint of a “rotten eggs or sulfur” odor should be handled on Protocol 60: Gas Leak/Gas Odor (Natural and LP Gases). As a safety net, Protocol 66 shunts the calltaker to Protocol 60 to which the clarifier “(rotten eggs/sulfur)” has been added.

For chemical suicide, the foremost chief complaint is usually an unresponsive person in a vehicle or small confined space—such as a closet or bathroom—with warning signs taped up. The odor of rotten eggs or sulfur may also be present; however, the odor is secondary to the foremost chief complaint of a chemical suicide.

            Formerly, Protocol 66 had a gray shunt for “Rotten eggs/Sulfur (HAZMAT)” to Protocol 61, but this shunt has been modified in FPDS v6.1a to remove the description of “Rotten eggs/Sulfur,” and now appears as “Chemical/HAZMAT” to prevent incorrectly shunting to Protocol 61. Two new rules have also been added to Protocol 66 to aid calltakers in choosing the most appropriate protocol.

“In the past year in particular, we have had a number of cases sent to us in which the stated chief complaint was ‘smell of rotten eggs,’ said Mike Thompson, Academy Fire Curriculum Council Chair and Priority Dispatch System Program Administrator—Fire & Medical. “Of those cases that were sent to us, almost exclusively they turned out to be natural gas leaks that ultimately were handled on Protocol 61 because of the shunt added to Protocol 66 to capture chemical suicide cases. But Protocol 61 was not set up to handle the inherent explosion risk and scene safety issues that come with a natural gas leak case, and so it needed to be corrected.”

FPDS v6.0 and v6.1 users will receive automatic FPDS v6.1a upgrades for Priority Dispatch Corp.’s ProQA® calltaking software and/or updated Protocol cards for their cardsets. For more information about FPDS v6.1a, visit www.emergencydispatch.org.

About the IAED

Founded in 1988, the IAED is the foremost standard-setting and certification organization for emergency communications with more than 59,500 members in 45 countries. More than 3,650 communication centers take advantage of IAED’s protocols and training—translated into 22 languages/dialects—for medical, fire, police, and nurse triage dispatch.

May 23, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kris Berg
800-363-9127, Ext. 116
kris.berg@emergencydispatch.org
www.emergencydispatch.org

 

IAED ANNOUNCES NEW CHAIR OF ED-Q COUNCIL OF STANDARDS

SALT LAKE CITY—The International Academies of Emergency Dispatch® (IAED™) is pleased to announce that Michael Spath has been selected to serve as Chair of the Academy’s Emergency Dispatch Quality Improvement Specialist (ED-Q™) Council of Standards as part of the Academy’s ongoing support of the emergency dispatch quality assurance process. The ED-Q Council of Standards is responsible for the ongoing refinement of the Emergency Dispatch Quality Assurance™ programs.

At the same time, the Academy would like to thank the council’s former Chair, Brian Dale, for his dedication and efforts to further the ED-Q Standards.

Spath is the Communications Manager for the city of Sunnyvale’s Department of Public Safety in California, USA; he has been a 911 professional since 1991. He is a Master Q Instructor for EPD-Q™, EFD-Q™, and EMD-Q®, and also serves as a member of the Journal of Emergency Dispatch’s Editorial Board.

When he's not working, Spath can be found with his wife, Tammy, and daughter, Emma, at CrossFit West in Santa Cruz—or trying to keep up with them in a Spartan race.

 

February 1, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Glenn Bischoff
331-200-1298
glennbischoff@mcp911.com

WASHINGTON (February 1, 2016)—A group of 911 organizations jointly announced today that it has been participating in an effort to develop recommended minimum training guidelines for the nation’s 911 call-takers and dispatchers. The topics to be included in the recommended guidelines were identified by members of the following organizations, as well as other key stakeholders representing the 911 community:

  • Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO)
  • Connecticut Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection
  • Denise Amber Lee Foundation
  • Fairfax County (Virginia) Department of Public Safety
  • Greater Harris County (Texas) 911 Network
  • Hamilton County (Indiana) Public Safety Communications
  • International Academies of Emergency Dispatch (IAED)
  • National Association of State 911 Administrators (NASNA)
  • National Emergency Number Association (NENA)
  • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
  • North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG)
  • PowerPhone
  • Priority Dispatch
  • RedSky Technologies
  • Rochester/Monroe County (New York) Emergency Communications Department
  • Vail (Colorado) Public Safety Communications Center
  • Weakley County (Tennessee) Emergency 911

The recommended topics are intended to give aspiring and current 911 telecommunicators (call-takers and dispatchers) nationally recognized, universally accepted minimum training that will be the foundation for ongoing professional development, according to Nathan Lee, president of the Denise Amber Lee Foundation.

“It is vitally important that Americans receive a consistent level of 911 service, no matter where they live or where they travel, and the recommended minimum training guidelines being developed collaboratively by these key organizations are a huge leap forward in achieving that goal,” Lee said.  

The recommended minimum training guidelines will cover the following topics:

  • Telecommunicator roles and responsibilities
  • 911 call processing
  • Radio communications
  • Emergency management
  • Emergency communications technology
  • Legal concepts
  • Interpersonal communications
  • Stress management
  • Quality assurance
  • On-the-job training guidelines

It is important to note that the training topics listed above only will provide a minimum level of understanding. In order to field and manage emergency calls in a live environment, telecommunicators must receive supplemental training that will enable them to process discipline-specific emergency calls that are fielded by their respective Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) or Emergency Services Provider. 

The recommended training topics have been vetted by the leadership of each participating organization. The next step will be to allow the 911 community at large to review and comment on the recommended minimum training guidelines. It is anticipated that the recommended guidelines will be finalized for distribution to public safety and emergency response agencies by the end of 2016.

A parallel goal is to develop model legislation that can be used within any state that does not currently have legislation in this area. For those that do, the model legislation is intended as a baseline to ensure that the recommended topics listed above are being covered.  The group recognizes and acknowledges that 911 is under the control of state and local authorities, and its intent is to assist those authorities having jurisdiction. These recommended guidelines are not a federal mandate.

Download Origional Press Release Document (*docx)
Provide Feedback (NENA Public Workspace)
View Training Document

November 6, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact Kris Berg
(800) 363-9127 ext. 116
kris.berg@emergencydispatch.org

Version 13 of the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®), scheduled for release in fall of 2015, represents the latest and greatest in a long line of Medical Protocol releases since making its inaugural appearance 36 years ago.

“This is a moment for the EMS history books,” said Jeff Clawson, M.D., inventor of the MPDS and principal author of the classic dispatch text “Principles of EMD—now in its fifth edition. “Version 13 captures the best pre-arrival care available to support and improve our proven standards of excellence in caller, bystander, and responder safety.”

MPDS v13 features improvements that affect nearly every protocol. New elements include a fast track to “hands on chest”; clearer definitions, Rules, and Axioms; and additional patient PAIs and PDIs.

Brett Patterson, IAED Medical Council of Standards Chair, called the “hands-on-chest” Fast Track a “significant” addition to an EMD’s toolkit, and it’s intended for patients who are initially and obviously described as being in cardiac arrest in the Case Entry sequence. A DLS Link from Case Entry to PAIs was introduced in MPDS v12.2, but the new Fast Track feature in v13 has already proven to further reduce hands-on-chest time, which translates into lives saved.

In addition to changes reducing the time to compressions, MPDS v13 also limits the use of the AGONAL BREATHING Detector that, according to extensive case review, was clearly being overused.

“While this diagnostic tool was designed to confirm that reported breathing actually is, all too often EMDs were using it to confirm the absence of breathing, which delays time to hands-on-chest,” Patterson said.

The new version is also crafted to better meet research parameters and allow more flexibility regarding local response assignment. For example, throughout the protocol, the Determinant Descriptors “Unconscious or Arrest” have been separated to allow for data collection and differentiation of local response.

Now as ever before, the protocol system reflects medical innovation, cultural nuances, contemporary life, expert counsel and ―most importantly―research into the science of dispatch, led by over 400 official Proposals for Change (PFCs) requests submitted by protocol users from communication centers worldwide.

Many new things very helpful to EMDs include a Chemical Suicide Diagnostic, Epi-Pen Assistance PAI, Narcan Admin Assistance PAI, Miscarriage PAI, plus new Drowning Protocol ECHOs. These are just a few of the many innovative improvements in v13. 

Worldwide, the MPDS is used in 3,000 agencies and translated in 14 languages, with users in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, and China. Currently, there are over 46,000 IAED-certified Emergency Medical Dispatchers.

For more information about MPDS v13 update, call the Academy at 800-363-9127 or visit the IAED website at http://www.emergencydispatch.org

View Medical v13.0 Demo

October 30, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT:
Glenn Bischoff
331-200-1298
glennbischoff@mcp911.com

WASHINGTON (November 1, 2015)—A group of 911 industry organizations jointly announced today that it has been participating in an industry-wide effort to develop minimum training guidelines for the nation’s 911 call-takers and dispatchers. The topics to be included in the guidelines were identified by members of the following organizations, as well as other key stakeholders representing the 911 communications sector:

  • Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO)
  • Connecticut Department of Emergency Services & Public Protection
  • Denise Amber Lee Foundation
  • Fairfax County (Virginia) Department of Public Safety
  • Greater Harris County (Texas) 911 Network
  • Hamilton County (Indiana) Public Safety Communications
  • International Academies of Emergency Dispatch (IAED)
  • National Association of State 911 Administrators (NASNA)
  • National Emergency Number Association (NENA)
  • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
  • North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG)
  • PowerPhone
  • Priority Dispatch
  • RedSky Technologies
  • Rochester/Monroe County (New York) Emergency Communications Department
  • Vail (Colorado) Public Safety Communications Center
  • Weakley County (Tenn.) Emergency 911

The topics are intended to give aspiring and current 911 telecommunicators (call-takers and dispatchers) nationally recognized, universally accepted minimum training that will be the foundation for ongoing professional development, according to Nathan Lee, president of the Denise Amber Lee Foundation.

“It is vitally important that Americans receive a consistent level of 911 service, no matter where they live or where they travel, and the minimum training guidelines being developed collaboratively by these key organizations are a huge leap forward in achieving that goal,” Lee said.  

The minimum training guidelines will cover the following topics:

  • Telecommunicator roles and responsibilities
  • 911 call processing
  • Radio communications
  • Emergency management
  • Emergency communications technology
  • Legal concepts
  • Interpersonal communications
  • Stress management
  • Quality assurance
  • On-the-job training guidelines

911 Telecommunicator Minimum Training

It is important to note that the training topics listed above only will provide a minimum-level of understanding. In order to field emergency calls in a live environment, telecommunicators must receive supplemental training that will enable them to process the emergency calls that are specific to their respective Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) or Emergency Services Provider. 

The recommended training topics have been vetted by the leadership of each participating group’s organizations. The next step will be to allow the 911 industry at large to review and comment on the minimum training guidelines. This will be accomplished via the NENA Workspace platform. 911 industry professionals wishing to review and comment on the Working Document can click here to be transported to NENA Workspace. Those wishing to simply review the “Minimum Training Guidelines” document can click here.

It is anticipated that the guidelines will be finalized for distribution to public safety and emergency response agencies prior to the end of the year.

A parallel goal is to develop model legislation that can be used within any state that does not currently have legislation in this area. For those that do, the model legislation is intended as a baseline to ensure that the topics listed above are being covered.  The group recognizes and acknowledges that 911 is under the control of state and local authorities, and its intent is to assist those authorities having jurisdiction, not to create a federal mandate.

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